How to Stop Procrastinating

I have, in my life, read hundreds of articles about procrastination; why it’s bad, how to stop, what your life would be like if you didn’t do it. I should note that I read many of these articles in lieu of working on a paper, project, or lesson plan.

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But recently I came across* a tip that worked. It’s not a long-term solution, it won’t break anyone of the habit, but in those moments where you just can’t get started, this works.

The tip: do nothing for a few minutes.

Yeah, that’s the big magic, stop doing anything. Literally sit somewhere, eyes open, and force yourself to stop; no tv, no phone, no nothing. Understand that this isn’t meditation, your thoughts are there and they’ll eat you alive while you’re forced to just sit there.

I tried this last night because it was 7 in the evening and I was still unable to get going on this state certification project that’s slowly draining my soul. Honestly, it seemed pretty stupid but I was desperate.

I sat on my couch and had to stop myself from planning things out in my head and picking up my phone, I even caught myself looking at my bookcases, deciding how I will pack the books when we move. But finally I put all of that aside and I felt…bored as hell. More importantly, the pressure to work on my project was unavoidable without distraction.

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I went for what I thought was ten minutes and finally decided to just get started on the damn project. When I picked up my phone it had been two minutes. Two minutes.

I think this was so effective because my entire being really did want to get going on this project and make headway, but my brain just kept finding activities that brought me more immediate joy. Without those things, or any other stimulus, I was left with that urgency to work and couldn’t ignore it.

Like I said before, this is not a cure to procrastination, but if you find yourself really stuck and unable to get going, give this a shot. And then come back and tell me about your experience in the comments: negative, positive, meh, I want to hear it all.

Best of luck

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*I wish I could remember my source but my overstressed brain can’t recall. Terrible historian alert, not citing her sources.

Francesca M. Healy

Learning to Take Care of My Damn Self

Growing up I watched my very motivated father work his fingers to the damn bone. If there was a retake needed by a football player, he’d stay until 6 to give it to them. If a parent meeting needed to happen at 5 am or 9 pm, he’d make it happen. If he needed to learn Spanish or trombone to get the information across, he’d do it.

Every evening I watched him get home late and fall asleep minutes after sitting down. And every single school break I watched him get horribly sick and spend his time off recovering.

When I started teaching I promised myself I would find a way to work for my kids, to give them every chance I can, without burning myself out.

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I have been blessed with a team of co-workers who are caring and understanding, who always look out for me. My co-teacher tells me often to take care of myself. The beginning of every department meeting is either a self care check-in (where we talk about our specific self care goals and what we are doing to reach them this week) or a self care practice (Tai Chi, guided meditation, etc.) My Assistant Principal meets with me once a week to lesson plan/unit plan/revise curriculum/talk about what’s not working and how to fix it. My in-school mentor meets with me once a week to talk about literally anything I need help with.

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I’m supported, much more so than a lot of teachers. I’m lucky and I know it. But still I got caught with a case of ignoring my own needs.

Last Monday I got up at 4 and laid on my couch sobbing because my head was pounding so hard I couldn’t move. I called in sick but by noon the fever, headache and general ick was so bad I couldn’t stop crying.

I went to the clinic in the afternoon (I’ll be honest I went mostly because I wanted to be at work the following day) and found out I had a high fever, a sinus infection, and an ear infection.

My point is: don’t do this. Don’t let it get this bad. I was sick, really obviously sick and tried to push too hard through it and for what?

Americans especially have this notion that if you are not absolutely killing yourself at work, you’re lazy. I can’t say this enough times: that’s bullsh*t.

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In Peru, we would work from about 7- or am until lunch, go get lunch and take a nap or spend time with family, and then go back to work from 3 until 5 or 6. Yeah, that’s a three hour lunch. We also took 20-30 minutes breaks throughout the day to sit and talk.

At first I was torn apart by the difference and went to the go-to argument so many others have used (or at least thought in their head): well maybe if they worked more, their country would be more advanced. This, my friends, is also bullsh*t.

The reasons that many countries struggle has more to do with internal structure and corruption than with amount of hours worked. Hard work may be important, but worker bees working their buzzers off with no break  will not improve a country or a city or a workplace or a person.

I suppose the moral of the story is: put in the work, do whatever it is you do the best that you possibly can, but remember that half of being your best is treating yourself well. Work hard, self care hard.

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Best of luck.

Learning to Take Care of My Damn Self

Feelings Friday: Feeling Phone-y

This week I’ve had a hard time; with blogging, with working, with going on a run without hurting myself. It’s been a week for sure.

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Lately I’ve been focusing on putting everything together for grad school and moving to New York, which mostly means thinking things are ok until I take one step forward and everything is 100% not ok. Between weird rental policies, holds on my student account, and casually taking out tens of thousands of dollars in loans financial aid, I’ve been absolutely killing myself with stress.

Until Tuesday when I left my phone at home.

When I first got to work, dug through my purse and realized I’d left it on my bed next to a slumbering Boyfriend, my first thought was “how strange, I should text Boyfriend, wait…”

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Not having my phone meant focusing on what was in front of me. It meant not checking for alerts or messages in between small children reading to me. It also meant not constantly refreshing my email to see if the realtor has gotten back to me. It meant a little peace and quiet from the self-induced stress machine that is the Internet.

Around lunch I panicked a bit, worried because I needed to work a couple of things out fairly urgently via email. However, on my lunch I found a staff computer and took care of everything in about five minutes. Without Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitstagram, Chatbook, Facelr, I was able to complete an important task without distraction.

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The starkest realization I had was that I didn’t really miss the internet constantly whispering in my ear. I didn’t get home and jump on my phone to make sure I hadn’t missed the trivial daily drama. I did check to see if I missed anything truly important and guess what, I didn’t.

So this week I’ve started leaving my phone in my purse, checking it once before lunch and then putting it away again. I haven’t missed anything dire yet and my stress level has plummeted. Turns out my phone is not my lifeline, but in some ways, my stressor.

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If you’re feeling anxious or stressed this week you should know: I feel you. I feel you so hard, bro. Take a breath, put down your phone and read a book or go for a walk. Do a thing that humans were built to do.

And best of luck.

***Sidenote: if anyone knows of any cheap(ish) apartments in NYC I’m listening…***

Nothing Should End Your World

About a month ago I was having coffee with BFF Jess, chatting about the future and all those scary, adult-y things.

Because Jess is leaving her current job at the end of May and then living in the woods for the summer,* she’s in the market for a new job for fall. Having applied to a few, she was feeling ok about some, more jazzed about others.

“You know, I really want the Montana job, but if I don’t get it, that’s ok. If the number one plan doesn’t work out, I’m sure I’ll find a new number one plan.”

Simple. Wildly complex.

Nothing should ever end your world, except the actually end of the world. If their is a meteor heading for Earth, feel free to stress cry, and then play that Ingrid Michaelson song, while standing on a hill in the wind looking ethereal until your ghastly end. Or whatever people do at the end of the world.

Outside of that scenario, there will always be another opportunity, another something new to be excited and nervous about.

Having done my fair share of failing in my life, I’d like to think that I let the bad stuff roll off me…mostly. Continue reading